Void Omnia – Dying Light

There are two ways to properly start a metal album. The first is to have a nice, acoustic or symphonic intro that builds up within the space a minute or two to set the mood of the album. The second is the immediately through the listener into the vortex of sound and fury. Void Omnia’s Dying Light is definitely the latter.

Upon my first listen I felt as though I had been ripped from the safety of the Earth and tossed into the whirling event horizon of a black hole. It was cacophonous and loud, a melody buried so deep within the distortion you could miss it if you weren’t looking for it already. Dying Light is a wild adventure of an album, from the very first second. There is a wall of sound that surrounds you, each with its own qualities and idiosyncrasies. The music hits you from every angle. There is, however, a binding force that keeps it all together and keeps it from overwhelming and turning off the listener: the vocals. They are harsh and nasty, raspy and angry, everything you could want in a black metal vocalist’s without sounding exactly like all the other ones out there. That is not to say that anything about the music of Dying Light is accessible. I hate that term because to me it means that it’s meant to grab a wider audience. Melody does not mean accessibility. It means a deeper understanding of music itself and the knowledge of creating an atmosphere with music alone rather than creating one with production (or lack thereof in many 90s clone bands).

Dying Light is not what I would call cosmic black metal, though it does teeter on the edge of that sub-genre. Rather I would call it brutal black metal, something akin to the raw black metal played up in Canada but instead of the cold, grim atmosphere there is a beefier, more robust sound. Good and evil don’t exist in nature, in space despite the fact that destruction and violence are a part of “life” in the cosmic void. There is no right or wrong, there is only strength and knowledge, there is sound and chaos. There is beauty in the midst of violence and death, there is no emotion, there is no fear or pain.

The lyrics are story like, not the verse/chorus/verse/bridge lyrical composition. It’s a unique journey into infinity. The lyrics are similar in nature to the music, a big plus. Small beings being ripped from the safety of Earth by something cosmic, amoral, and chaotic. We as listeners experience the same journey as the album’s protagonist. We encounter all the strangeness, the adventure, and the wisdom. We feel the emotions, fear and wonder, and we can feel ourselves becoming something more, something different as the sound of the album changes from song to song. I don’t know if I would call this a concept album but there is a clearly defined progression in the music that leads me to believe that there is a story in here.

I highly recommend this album, and this band. They have created some amazing music in just a few short years since their inception. They come from the Bay Area but there’s not a trace of thrash in their music. The production and sound quality are top notch, there is a lot of chaos in the music but that’s exactly what it’s supposed to sound like. Superb!

DyingLight

9/10


Listen and support!

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